Philosophy, science and faith: more than complementary, mutually dependent. A one-day conference explored the relationship between the sciences and humanities.

In this Year of Faith, the courage of Pope Benedict XVI reminds us that a theology that does not take into account the continuous spur of philosophical and scientific research is not authentic theology, which is why we are called to consider the interaction of the three areas. And the award “Renata Borlone, woman in dialogue”, awarded yesterday in Loppiano to astrophysicist and cosmologist Piero Benvenuti, fascinated the audience present as well as those who followed via the internet, showing the richness of as well as the need for such a relationship. The figure of Renata Borlone, servant of God after whom the prize is named, was the focus of the first part of the afternoon in which questions were also raised about the opportunity to support the cause of beatification. “If the proclamation of the sanctity of someone serves to recognise the primacy of God, why not?” said Maria Voce, president of the Focolare, at LoppianoLab in September last year. And whoever knew Renata personally knows well how much these words define her.¬†Hers was a path of holiness, which is a testimony “of the relationship, the synodality, the reciprocity with those around us,” Maria Voce continued.

There followed the award ceremony of Professor Piero Benvenuti, currently Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Padua, Consultant of the Pontifical Council for Culture and director CISAS (Centre of Studies and Activities for Space). The award recognised the constant tension to the transcendent in his scientific work, his work in spreading and disseminating scientific truth, making a real contribution to the human person, and his contribution to the dialogue between natural sciences and Christian theology.

Benvenuti receives the Borlone Award
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